Signed Botanical Walk in Redwood Bush

Friends of Tawa Bush Reserves (FOTBR) has worked with WCC to design and produce a signed botanical walk, that features twenty of the native trees in Redwood Bush. Local Tawa signage company ‘Imagine That’ has made the signs and members of FOTBR will finance and install them. One sample is shown below. Large text andContinue reading “Signed Botanical Walk in Redwood Bush”

A new book about Tawa, available in October 2022

Redwood Bush, Tawa This book will be launched at 6pm on Tuesday 18 October 2022 in the Tawa Community Centre, Cambridge Street. This is author, Gilbert (Gil.) Roper’s third publication relating to Tawa. He was motivated to write this new book: Redwood Bush, Tawa after reading how Redwood Bush was saved when the Redwood subdivisionContinue reading “A new book about Tawa, available in October 2022”

‘Beating the Bounds’ in Tawa – Tararua Tramping Club hold day walk in Tawa reserves

Photo of map showing circuit taken: Christine Whiteford On Wednesday 18 May, a group from the Tararua Tramping Club undertook a walk, circumnavigating Tawa using the various reserves. The sunny weather enabled the group to enjoy the great views as well as the vibrant flora and fauna. Leader John Allard, a resident of Tawa forContinue reading “‘Beating the Bounds’ in Tawa – Tararua Tramping Club hold day walk in Tawa reserves”

Do you recognise these podocarp seedlings?

Podocarps are conifers that reproduce by bearing cones and fruit. The nursery is in full production with podocarp seedlings at various stages of development. These have all been sourced locally from seed or young seedlings that have been subsequently potted on. See if you can match the correct name to the right seedling in theContinue reading “Do you recognise these podocarp seedlings?”

Know the native trees in Tawa reserves with Gil Roper – Myrsine australis, red matipo, māpou, māpau

Source of names: ‘Ma’ = free of tapu, ‘pou’ = stick. Young plants are used for ceremonial purposes such as karakia. Special Features an endemic shrub growing up to 6m tall, they are very obvious because of their young reddish-brown stems that bear pale green leaves that have a leathery texture and wavy edges leavesContinue reading “Know the native trees in Tawa reserves with Gil Roper – Myrsine australis, red matipo, māpou, māpau”

Kākāriki frequently heard and sighted in Redwood Bush

Kākāriki or red-crowned parakeets are one of three species of endemic parakeets found in NZ. The name means ‘small green parrot’ because of their predominantly green plumage. They make a loud rapid chatter in flight and also chatter and babble when feeding. Such sounds have been regularly heard, especially at the north end of RedwoodContinue reading “Kākāriki frequently heard and sighted in Redwood Bush”

Know the native trees in Tawa reserves with Gil Roper – Geniostoma ligustrifolium var. ligustrifolium,  Hangehange, Māori privet

A common shrub up to 3m high, it is commonly found at the edge of bush and along the tracks. Leaves are oppositely positioned along the slender, brittle stems. The oval, elongated and soft, shiny lettuce-green leaves have ‘drip tips’ at the end. Source of names: Genus: genio = hairy and stoma = mouth. TheContinue reading “Know the native trees in Tawa reserves with Gil Roper – Geniostoma ligustrifolium var. ligustrifolium,  Hangehange, Māori privet”

FOTBR receives Tawa Community Civic award

FOTBR was one of the recipients of this award in the ‘Heritage and Environment’ category. Owing to Covid-19 restrictions, an awards ceremony will not take place, but people have been notified and recipients listed on the Tawa Community Board Facebook page. https://www.facebook.com/tawacommunityboard The voluntary work undertaken by FOTBR, included: the development of a new walkingContinue reading “FOTBR receives Tawa Community Civic award”

Know the native trees in Tawa reserves with Gil Roper – Melicytus ramiflorus, māhoe, whitey wood

This is one of the most common sub-canopy trees in the Tawa native bush reserves. Source of names: Genus Melicytus. From Greek ‘meli’ = honey and ‘kytos’ = hollow container. It refers to the staminal nectaries of the flowers. (‘honey cave’). Species = ramiflorus meaning flowers are borne from branches. Māhoe. ‘Ma’ = shame, ‘hoe’Continue reading “Know the native trees in Tawa reserves with Gil Roper – Melicytus ramiflorus, māhoe, whitey wood”

Puriri moths – an extreme life cycle

Pūriri moths (Aenetus virescens or pepe tuna) are New Zealand’s largest endemic flying moth. Larvae hatch on the bush floor and feed on fungi. Then they climb tree trunks such as pūriri (hence their name) and burrow into the trunk where they live for several years. Pūriri trees only have a northern distribution in the North Island.Continue reading “Puriri moths – an extreme life cycle”